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Rude Food

Food

The superfood spectrum

Superfoods are foods that are highly beneficial to our health. But which are the best, what do they offer and how can you eat them without breaking the bank?...
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Food

The fats of life

Not all fats and oils are bad, but how can you make sure you choose the most healthy for cooking and eating?...
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Free world

Being told you are intolerant to a particular food can make buying and cooking food more difficult. So what role can free-from foods play?
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Growing up strong

Healthy children are full of energy and vitality and a balanced diet is key to maintaining this. Here’s how to keep them in tip-top health...
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Star quality

Just what makes a food ‘super’ and how can you incorporate them into your diet?
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Fuelling your day

Just why do carbohydrates have such a bad name, and how can you make sure you choose good carbs over less healthy versions?...
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The medicinal chef on a mission

Dale Pinnock BSc (hons), PgDip (Nutr Med), also known as the medicinal chef, combines the science of nutrition with the culinary arts. His new book is called How to Cook Healthily.

“When I am cooking for myself and busy working at home I cook certain staples such as lightly cooked greens or salad, sweet potato wedges and loads of humous. Perfect comfort food! When time allows I will get more creative in the kitchen. I go through phases – for example, I might be into Japanese- or Greek-influenced food.

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Super veggie protein

Rude Health magazine discovers the best vegetarian proteins and how you can incorporate them into your diet

Protein plays an important role in our diet. “Your body requires protein for many different functions such as growth, digestion, energy and vitality, mood and behaviour, performance and recovery and a healthy immune system,” says Oliver McCabe of Select Stores in Dalkey, Co Dublin and author of The Fuel Food Cookbook. “Protein is basically the building block that you use to produce natural chemical reactions to assist the digestion, absorption and metabolism of foods.”

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Sweet enough

Sugar is fast becoming one of the biggest food baddies we are all exposed to, but how can you navigate a path to healthier sweetness? Rude Health asks the experts

“Sugar being bad for you has hit the headlines massively lately,” says Sally Smith of Open Sesame in Ennis, Co Clare and Gort, Co Galway, “But health food stores have been saying this for years.”

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Your guide to healthy fats and oils

We all needs fat to survive, even though they often have a bad name. Read on for your best options

“Healthy fats are important to help you feel fuller for longer and they help aid the essential functions in your body,” says Oliver McCabe of Select Stores in Dalkey, co Dublin.

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A grain of truth

Don’t be afraid to try some new grains and extend your sources of carbohydrates

“Grains have always been really popular as they are so versatile and nutritious and there is a great variety to choose from,” says Lucy Kerr of The Good Earth in Kilkenny. “Some of our most popular grains include quinoa, which is a complete protein including all essential amino acids and is a rich source of fibre and iron and is gluten-free; and buckwheat, which is actually a member of the rhubarb family, is a great source of protein, magnesium and manganese and gluten-free.”

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Super heroes

Super foods are the heroes of the healthy eating world. Here’s the inside track on the best available and how to cook and eat them

What are super foods?

Super foods are foods that do not just nourish the body but provide additional nutritional and medicinal benefits because they have very high concentrations of vitamins, minerals and antioxidants. Chia seeds, seaweed, bee pollen, coconut oil, cacao and goji berries are just a few as well as some less exotic-sounding ingredients such as oats, nuts and seeds.

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Free (from) and easy

If you’ve been told you are gluten or dairy intolerant you may wonder what you can eat. Luckily, your local health store is a great source of advice and information

Why eat free-from?

“A lot of our customers suffer from severe allergies or intolerances and have to be really careful about what they eat,” says Angela McGlanaghey at Simple Simon in Donegal town, “others may choose to avoid certain food groups for health, lifestyle or dietary reasons.”

“We get a lot of customers coming in and asking for free-from foods because they have a health issue,” says Margaret Guthrie-Nally, a nutritional therapist at Evergreen health stores. “They are usually avoiding sugar, dairy and gluten. We have also noticed an increase in those who are choosing free-from foods as a lifestyle choice and they often benefit from sleeping better, not getting sick as often and reduced bloating.”

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Protein power!

The best meat-free proteins for health

Protein without meat

“It is quite possible to access the full range of amino acids which make up a complete protein through non-animal sources,” says Sian Morgan of Healing Harvest, Kinvara, Co Galway. “You will need a good varied diet consisting of nuts, wholegrains and pulses – these do not need to be consumed in the same meal, but preferably during the same day or so. Unless we are training hard or trying to build muscle for a particular reason, our protein requirements are roughly 56g per day for men and 46g per day for women unless pregnant or breastfeeding when it rises to 71g. A number of current diets place a great stress on the consumption of protein, but it should be relatively easy to reach the levels required on a daily basis through a balanced diet combining a variety of wholefoods.”

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Oils & their health benefits

Not all oils are bad – some have positive health benefits and are suited to different kinds of eating and cooking. Rude Health gets the facts

“We all need fat in our diet,” says Rob Whinnett of Blasta Wholefoods in Dungarvan, Co. Waterford. “It keeps us warm, adds flavour to our food and carries essential vitamins like A, D, E and K. Oils also contain essential fatty acids (omega 3 and 6) which cannot be produced by the body and are vital for heart health, skin and brain function.”

Nutritional therapist Aoife Martinho works in the Health Store in the Frascati Centre in Blackrock, Co Dublin: “Good fats are essential for optimum brain, eye and digestive function, energy levels as well as hormone production and vitamin absorption.”

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Ancient Grains

Many people are looking for a healthier alternative to heavily refined modern wheat. Ancient grains are less processed and give us more vitamins, minerals and fibre than modern forms of wheat. We find out what the experts say

“Ancient grains such as quinoa, amaranth and buckwheat represent a ‘back to the source’ approach to nutrition,” says Jason Linton of Iswari Ireland, an organic and raw superfoods company based in Kinsale, Co Cork.

“Before crops such as wheat were being sold on a mass commercial scale, they were far less modified and more complete sources of nutrients. At Iswari we take it one step further by sprouting the grains. This increases the nutrient content, and also the bioavailability of the nutrients in the grains, since the sprouting process transforms heavier starches and proteins into a more digestible form.”

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Going organic

The case for choosing organic food is becoming stronger. Rude Health magazine finds out why

What is Organic?

John Halpin, the Health Store, Dundrum: “Organic means food being free from artificial fertilisers, pesticides, and also from being of GMO (Genetically Modified Organism) origin.”

Gillian Westbrook of the Irish Organic Farmers & Growers Association (IOFGA): “Organic regulations cover the entire food chain, from farm production, right through to the processing and packaging stage. Organic has a set of principles that aim to safeguard our environment, improve animal welfare and produce clean, safe food for the consumer. Many substances and ingredients are prohibited in organic food. Therefore organic meat cannot have been fed cereals that contain GMOs, or cereals that have been sprayed with synthetic herbicides prior to harvest.”

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A photo of a woman holding goji berries

Super stars

Super foods are healthy foods that provide additional nutritional and medicinal benefits. Rude Health looks at the benefits of including them in your diet


What makes them super?

Niall Fennell of Nua Naturals based in Galway: “Superfoods are simply foods with very high concentrations of vitamins, minerals and all things good. Chia, bee pollen, coconut oil, hemp seeds, cacao, goji berries are just a few. I love cacao nibs, maca powder and coconut oil – amazing for keeping my mind alert, energy up throughout the day and protecting my future health.”

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A photo of a young woman drinking milk

Free-from explained

Whether you are intolerant of certain foods or choose to live a vegan lifestyle, it’s now easier to avoid eating wheat, dairy and sugar and choose alternatives instead


“People are becoming much more aware of what they eat, and the fact that different foods can affect how they feel, and can be linked to symptoms such as IBS, bloating, skin problems, migraines, fatigue and low mood,” says Dr Gill Hart, Scientific Director of YorkTest Laboratories who develop food allergy home testing kits.

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A photo of some raw foods in a bowl

Eat for energy

Just what sort of foods should you be eating if you want to improve your energy levels? Rude Health magazine asks the experts


Autumn blues

“There is no doubt that the autumn days with fading light can put a load on energy reserves,” says Alan McGrath from The Health Store in Tuam, Co Galway (below). “The darkening days and drop in temperatures most definitely have effects on metabolism and overall wellbeing. “Customers come in to The Health Store and ask for something to improve their energy levels, especially since we’ve added a new raw food smoothie/juice bar.”

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I can’t eat that

A photo of a girl with her hands across her face

Having problems digesting certain foods? You may be intolerant. There are a number of different natural solutions to help you to enjoy a wide and varied diet


Word on the street

Sian Eustace, owner of Healing Harvest in Kinvara, Co Galway is a registered homeopath. “We would deal with a large range of food health- related questions including allergies and intolerances, particularly to dairy and wheat or gluten,” she explains. “Lately we have had lots of enquiries about the paleo diet, which excludes dairy products, grains, potatoes, refi salt and sugar and processed oils. We also have queries about foods to help with constipation, high cholesterol, low energy and many more.”

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Previous Rude Food Articles:

Super foods

A photo of some super foods

These six natural foods are indeed super, and available in your local Irish health store. Check out what they can do for you

Seaweed
Tell me more

Growing naturally on Irish coasts, in particular the west and north-west, one of the best known seaweeds is Dulse or Dillisk. Others include sea lettuce, bladderwrack, kombu or kelp, wakame and Carrageen moss.
Who is it good for?
Those who want to detox their diet, as seaweed has detoxing properties.

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A photo of some raw food

Raw kitchen

Raw food is becoming something of a buzzword for healthy eating, but what exactly is it? Rude Health magazine talks to some raw food experts

Raw food is growing in popularity – after all, these foods are rich in beneficial antioxidants and phytonutrients and help to balance out the body’s pH levels. In the raw diet you will find fruits, vegetables, seeds and nuts, soya, pulses and soaked and sprouted grains, but you won’t find wheat, dairy and meat products and nothing is cooked or processed.
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The morning after
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Beautiful breakfasts - without gluten, dairy or sugar
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Healthy lunch boxes and snacks for school
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Raw foods: why they are growing in popularity
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Delicious picnic creations free of meat, wheat, dairy and sugar
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Yummy cakes and savouries
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Super foods: which ones are packed with health properties?
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Latest articles from Rude Health Magazine...